Archives par mot-clé : Jean Maitron

The archives of Georges Haupt: new research on the history of socialism

A few months ago, the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme library in Paris made public the archival fonds of historian Georges Haupt (1928-1978). This fonds includes important archives related to the history of European socialism before the First World War, especially about socialism history in Eastern Europe and the Balkans. In particular, Haupt kept a significant part of Camille Huysmans’ archives – a Belgian politician who was Secretary of the International Socialist Bureau (ISB), the governing body of the Socialist International at the beginning of the 20th century and founded in 1900. In this fonds, many unpublished documents were discovered, including correspondences between the ISB and numerous socialists in Europe and in the world. Haupt had published in his lifetime the first part of these correspondences.

In all, more than a thousand original documents that were entrusted to Georges Haupt can be found in this archival fonds, some of them being completely unpublished. This is the case, for instance, of a letter written by Hardling and addressed to Huymans about the early developments of socialism in China. This letter written in English will be translated in Chinese and published in the Yearbook of socialism (Shanghai) in 2016, in the framework of the partnership established by EUROSOC. That letter was partially quoted by Haupt himself – a letter he thus possessed – in La Deuxième Internationale et l’Orient (The Second International and the East, cowritten with Madeleine Rebérioux in 1967) but had remained in its entirety completely unpublished. Extensive research will certainly allow us to identify the same type of documents.

Georges Haupt’s archives also contain many manuscripts – some of whom are unpublished – on the history of socialism. In particular, he devoted a lot of time to working on the figure of Christian Rakovski, the socialist and then communist revolutionary. Several French researchers are thus currently working on this rich archival fonds; for example, Lucie Guesnier will defend a doctoral thesis under the supervision of Michel Dreyfus on the history of socialism in Romania in September 2016.

The readers who are keen to better know Georges Haupt’s life may refer to the special issue of the Cahiers Jaurès coordinated by Jean-Numa Ducange and Marion Fontaine (Cahiers Jaurès « Georges Haupt, l’Internationale pour méthode », Cahiers Jaurès, n° 203, January-March 2012), whose texts essentially come from a study day held at the University of Bergamo, new partner of EUROSOC.

A few biographical elements can be here reminded. Haupt was born in Romania in 1928 and died prematurely of a heart attack in Rome in 1978. He was born in Satu Mare, Transylvania, in a family of the Jewish Bourgeoisie and spent his teenage years in Auschwitz as a deported Jew. When the war ended, he first led a lightning academic career in the new Socialist Republic of Romania. After studying in Leningrad, he became a young professor at the Academy of Sciences as expert in the history of socialism, especially on the relationships between Romanian and Russian social democrats before 1914. In 1958, while attending a symposium in Paris, he decided to stay and not go back to Romania. After serious difficulties, he obtained a teaching position at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (French: École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, EHESS) and led a seminar on the history of the Second International where the best specialists of the time were invited. He defended a thesis under the supervision of Ernest Labrousse – the great economic historian and expert on the history of socialism – that was published in 1964: La Deuxième Internationale, 1889-1914. Etude critique des sources. Essai bibliographique (Translation: The Second International, 1899-1914. Critical study of the sources. A Bibliographic Essay). At the same time, he led an active publication policy, especially as part of the publishing house of François Maspero where he was the editor of the “Bibliothèque socialiste” (socialist library) collection as from 1963. The collection published many classics as well as rare material – even unknown ones – on the history of labor movements in their different sensitivities. Forty books were published in this collection, many of whom remain usable references nowadays. It is worth mentioning the whole collection[1]:

— 1. BOUKHARINE Nicolas & PREOBRAJENSKY Eugène, The Rudiments of Communism, preface by Pierre Broué, Paris, Maspero, 1963.

— 2. LUXEMBURG Rosa, Mass Strikes, Party and Trade Unions, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 3. LUXEMBURG Rosa, The Russian Revolution, preface by Robert Paris, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 4. COLLECTIF, The Bolsheviks and the October Revolution, Minutes of the Central Committee of the Bolshevik party, August 1917-February 1918, introduction by Guiseppe Boffa, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 5. LAFARGUE Paul, The Right to Be Idle, preface by Jean-Marie Brohm, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 6. HAUPT Georges, The Failed Congress: The International on the Eve of the First World War, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 7. COLLECTIF, Stalin Against Trotsky, 1924-1926. The Permanent Revolution and Socialism in a Single Country, introduction and selection of texts by Guiliano Procacci, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 8. FRÖLICH Paul, Rosa Luxemburg, Her Life, Her Work, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 9. FISCHER Georges, The Labour Party and the Decolonization of India, Paris, Maspero, 1966.

— 10. ADLER Max, Democracy and Workers’ Councils, translation and introduction by Yvon Bourde, Paris, Maspero, 1967.

— 11. LUXEMBURG Rosa, The Accumulation of the Capital, introduction by Irène Petit, 2 volumes., Paris, Maspero, 1967.

— 12. ARCHIVES MONATTE, Revolutionary Trade Unionism and Communism, introduction by Colette Chambelland and Jean Maitron , Paris, Maspero, 1968.

— 13. HAUPT Georges & MARIE Jean-Jacques, The Bolsheviks As They Described Themselves, Paris, Maspero, 1969.

— 14. BERNSTEIN Samuel, Auguste Blanqui, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 15. KOSIK Karel, The Dialectic of Hard Facts, Paris, Maspero, 1970 et 1978.

— 16. DOMMANGET Maurice, On Gracchus Babeuf and the Conspiracy of the Equals, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 17. LIEBKNECHT Karl, Militarism, War, Revolution, selection of texts and introduction by Claudie Weill, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 18. LOWY Michaël, The Theory of Revolution in Young Marx’s works, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 19. SADOUL Jacques, Notes about the Bolshevik Revolution, Paris, Maspero, 1971.

— 20. GRAS Christian, Alfred Rosmer and the International Revolutionary Movement, Paris, Maspero, 1971.

— 21. NETTL John Peter, The Life and Works of Rosa Luxemburg, Volume 1, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 22. NETTL John Peter, The Life and Works of Rosa Luxemburg, Volume 2, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 23. FLECHTHEIM Ossip K., The German Communist Party under the Weimar Republic, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 24. CONFINO Michaël, Violence in the Violence, the Debate Bakounine-Netchaïev,  Paris, Maspero, 1973.

— 25. KOLLONTAÏ Alexandra, Marxism and the Sexual Revolution, preface and introduction by Judith Stora-Sandor, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 26. GRANDJONC Jacques, Marx and the German Communists, Paris, Maspero, 1974.

— 27. HAUPT Georges, LOWY Michael & WEILL Claudie, Marxists and the National Issue 1848-1914, Paris, Maspero, 1974.

— 28. MAITRON Jean, The Anarchist Movement in France. I – from its origins to 1914, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 29. MAITRON Jean, The Anarchist Movement in France. I – from 1914 to the present day, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 30. HEMERY Daniel, Vietnamese Revolutionaries and Colonial Power in Indochina, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

—31. LUXEMBURG Rosa, Long Live the Fight ! Correspondence 1891-1914, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 32. MONATTE Pierre, The Union Struggle, Paris, Maspero, 1976.

— 33. WEILL Claudie, Russian Marxists and German Social Democracy 1898-1904, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 34. LUXEMBURG Rosa, I was, I am, I will be ! Correspondence 1914-1919, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 35. SERGE Victor & TROTSKY Léon, The Struggle Against Stalinisn, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 36. BOURDÉ Guy, The Defeat of the Popular Front, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 37. COHEN Stephen, Nicolas Boukharine, The Life of a Bolshevik, Paris, Maspero, 1979.

— 38. LOWY Michaël, Marxism in Latin American from 1909 to the present day: an anthology, Paris, Maspero, 1980.

— 39. HAUPT Georges, The Historian and the Social Movement, Paris, Maspero, 1980.

— 40. LUKACS György, Letters from the Youth: 1908-1917, selection of letters, prefaced and annotated by Éva Fekete et Éva Karádi, translated from Hungarian and German by István Fodor, József Herman, Ernö Kenéz and Éva Szilágyi, Paris, Maspero, 1981.

The list of these works allows one to measure just how much the Maspero collection contributed to socialism knowledge in the world, its theorists, and it history. As shown by these archives, many other projects existed. In other publishing houses, Haupt also published several outstanding contributions on the history of Bolshevism and the international labor movement. For example, he also coordinated a dictionary relating to the history of the Austrian labor movement. Moreover, it is interesting to note the book that he published with Michael Löwy et Claudie Weill : Les marxistes et la question nationale (reedited by l’Harmattan publishing house). This book reunited numerous texts about the controversial issue that is the nation and nationalisms in international labor movements.

Several of the most noteworthy articles are reunited in a collection published post-mortem in 1980: L’historien et le mouvement social (Maspero publishing house). An English version of this work, different from the French edition, was published and prefaced by the famous British historian Eric Hobsbawm (Aspects of International Socialism 1871-1914, Cambridge-Paris, 1986).

A study day will be held at the University of Rouen – during a EUROSOC meeting – on Georges Haupt’s archives on 7 December 2016. EUROSOC, with other partners, is engaged in a valuation process of these archives. The study day will be the opportunity to deal with the elements we have here briefly presented in depth.

Jean-Numa Ducange
EUROSOC coordinator

[1] We are using the list established by the Smolny group on the very rich website by confronting it to the Bibliothèque Nationale de France catalogue.

Full version.pdf

Les archives de Georges Haupt : nouvelles recherches sur l’histoire du socialisme. Deuxième partie

La première partie est disponible ici.

O83jZzjzsI03elHFSWfaArjBtChtFw9koB4ea3rH52Qw834-h625-no

Dossier « Tensions induites par la crise d’Agadir (1911) », fonds Georges Haupt, Archives de la FMSH.

Quarante ouvrages furent publiés dans cette collection dont de nombreuses références qui demeurent encore utilisables aujourd’hui. Il vaut la peine de mentionner toute la collection ici[1] :

 

— 1. BOUKHARINE Nicolas & PREOBRAJENSKY Eugène, A.B.C. du communisme, préface de Pierre Broué, Paris, Maspero, 1963.

— 2. LUXEMBURG Rosa, Grève de masses, parti et syndicats, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 3. LUXEMBURG Rosa, La révolution russe, préface de Robert Paris, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 4. COLLECTIF, Les bolcheviks et la Révolution d’Octobre, procès-verbaux du Comité Central du parti bolchevique, août 1917 – février 1918, présentation de Guiseppe Boffa, Paris, Maspero, 1964.

— 5. LAFARGUE Paul, Le droit à la paresse, préface de Jean-Marie Brohm, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 6. HAUPT Georges, Le congrès manqué : l’Internationale à la veille de la Première Guerre Mondiale, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 7. COLLECTIF, Staline contre Trotsky, 1924-1926. La révolution permanente et le socialisme dans un seul pays, présentation et choix de textes de Guiliano Procacci, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 8. FRÖLICH Paul, Rosa Luxemburg, sa vie, son oeuvre, Paris, Maspero, 1965.

— 9. FISCHER Georges, Le Parti travailliste et la décolonisation de l’Inde, Paris, Maspero, 1966.

— 10. ADLER Max, Démocratie et conseils ouvriers, traduction et présentation d’Yvon Bourdet, Paris, Maspero, 1967.

— 11. LUXEMBURG Rosa, L’accumulation du capital, présentation d’Irène Petit, 2 vols., Paris, Maspero, 1967.

— 12. ARCHIVES MONATTE, Syndicalisme révolutionnaire et communisme, présentation de Colette Chambelland et Jean Maitron, Paris, Maspero, 1968.

— 13. HAUPT Georges & MARIE Jean-Jacques, Les bolcheviks par eux mêmes, Paris, Maspero, 1969.

— 14. BERNSTEIN Samuel, Auguste Blanqui, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 15. KOSIK Karel, La dialectique du concret, Paris, Maspero, 1970 et 1978.

— 16. DOMMANGET Maurice, Sur Babeuf et la conjuration des Egaux, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 17. LIEBKNECHT Karl, Militarisme, guerre, révolution, choix de textes et présentation de Claudie Weill, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 18. LOWY Michaël, La théorie de la révolution chez le jeune Marx, Paris, Maspero, 1970.

— 19. SADOUL Jacques, Notes sur la révolution bolchevique, Paris, Maspero, 1971.

— 20. GRAS Christian, Alfred Rosmer et le mouvement révolutionnaire international, Paris, Maspero, 1971

— 21. NETTL John Peter, La vie et l’oeuvre de Rosa Luxemburg – Tome I, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 22. NETTL John Peter, La vie et l’oeuvre de Rosa Luxemburg – Tome II, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 23. FLECHTHEIM Ossip K., Le Parti communiste allemand sous la République de Weimar, Paris, Maspero, 1972.

— 24. CONFINO Michaël, Violence dans la violence, le débat Bakounine-Netchaïev, Paris, Maspero, 1973.

— 25. KOLLONTAÏ Alexandra, Marxisme et révolution sexuelle, préface et présentation de Judith Stora-Sandor, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 26. GRANDJONC Jacques, Marx et les communistes allemands, Paris, Maspero, 1974.

— 27. HAUPT Georges, LOWY Michael & WEILL Claudie, Les marxistes et la question nationale 1848-1914, Paris, Maspero, 1974.

— 28. MAITRON Jean, Le mouvement anarchiste en France. I – Des origines à 1914, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 29. MAITRON Jean, Le mouvement anarchiste en France. II – De 1914 à nos jours, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 30. HEMERY Daniel, Révolutionnaires vietnamiens et pouvoir colonial en Indochine, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 31. LUXEMBURG Rosa, Vive la lutte ! Correspondance 1891-1914, Paris, Maspero, 1975.

— 32. MONATTE Pierre, La lutte syndicale, Paris, Maspero, 1976.

— 33. WEILL Claudie, Marxistes russes et social-démocratie allemande 1898-1904, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 34. LUXEMBURG Rosa, J’étais, je suis, je serai ! Correspondance 1914-1919, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 35. SERGE Victor & TROTSKY Léon, La lutte contre le stalinisme, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 36. BOURDÉ Guy, La défaite du front populaire, Paris, Maspero, 1977.

— 37. COHEN Stephen, Nicolas Boukharine, la vie d’un bolchevik, Paris, Maspero, 1979.

— 38. LOWY Michaël, Le marxisme en Amérique latine de 1909 à nos jours : anthologie, Paris, Maspero, 1980.

— 39. HAUPT Georges, L’historien et le mouvement social, Paris, Maspero, 1980.

— 40. LUKACS György, Correspondance de jeunesse : 1908-1917, choix de lettres préfacé et annoté par Éva Fekete et Éva Karádi, traduit du hongrois et de l’allemand par István Fodor, József Herman, Ernö Kenéz et Éva Szilágyi, Paris, Maspero, 1981.

La liste de ces ouvrages permet de mesurer le grand apport de la collection de Maspero pour la connaissance du socialisme dans le monde, ses théoriciens et son histoire. Et de nombreux autres projets existaient comme le montrent ses archives. Haupt publie également chez d’autres éditeurs plusieurs contributions marquantes sur l’histoire du bolchévisme et du mouvement ouvrier international. Il a aussi par exemple coordonné un dictionnaire relatif à l’histoire du mouvement ouvrier autrichien. Il faut aussi relever l’importante somme Les marxistes et la question nationale qu’il a édité avec Michael Löwy et Claudie Weill (rééditée aux éditions l’Harmattan), réunissant de très nombreux textes sur la question controversée de la nation et des nationalismes dans les mouvements ouvriers internationaux.

Plusieurs de ses articles parmi les plus marquants sont réunis dans un recueil publié post-mortem en 1980, L’historien et le mouvement social (aux éditions Maspero). Une version anglaise de cet ouvrage, différente de l’édition française, a paru, avec une préface du célèbre historien britannique Eric Hobsbawm (Aspects of International Socialism 1871-1914, Cambridge-Paris, 1986).

Une journée se tiendra à l’université de Rouen (à l’occasion d’une réunion d’EUROSOC) sur les archives de Georges Haupt le 7 décembre 2016. EUROSOC, avec d’autres partenaires, est engagé dans un processus de valorisation de ces archives. La journée sera l’occasion d’approfondir les éléments que nous avons brièvement présentés ici.

Jean-Numa Ducange
Coordinateur d’EUROSOC

Nous publierons la semaine prochaine l’article dans son intégralité accompagné de sa version anglaise.

[1] Nous reprenons la liste établie sur le très riche site du collectif Smolny en le confrontant au catalogue de la Bibliothèque Nationale de France.

Les archives de Georges Haupt deuxieme partie.pdf

Synthèse pour une historiographie de l’histoire socialiste italienne Version complète

ENGLISH VERSION

 

portrait d'Alessandro

portrait d’Alessandro Schiavi par Gianfranco Campestrini, Raccolte d’arte dell’Ospedale Maggiore, Milan

Une bibliographie raisonnée des recherches sur le socialisme italien et international de la période de la II Internationale écrite par des historiens italiens aurait été sans doute très riche si l’on tenait compte surtout des années 1950-1980. Les années suivantes ont en effet été marquées par un certain « refoulement » de l’intérêt pour ces sujets.

Un peu partout en Europe mais en Italie surtout il y a eu une sorte de superposition mutuelle entre l’histoire du socialisme et les histoires du syndicalisme et des mondes du travail. Or à plusieurs occasions on a pu constater un retour des historiens de la dernière génération aux histoires des mondes du travail et des migrations, histoires qui ont permis la naissance d’une association (à laquelle je participe), la SISLav, Associazione italiana degli sorici del lavoro.

Mais après les années 1970 traversées par des historiens passionnés des luttes ouvrières et de leurs histoires politiques, aujourd’hui les jeunes historiens des mondes du travail sont plutôt méfiants envers ces croisements. La plupart des publications historiques relatives aux socialismes sont plutôt consacrées à l’histoire « républicaine », aux vicissitudes des partis socialistes jusqu’à la crise provoquée par le secrétariat de Bettino Craxi et les procès pour corruption qui ont frappé les partis italiens de gouvernement. Je ne cite que quelques noms : le grand historien et maître Enzo Collotti, Luciano Marrocu, Leonardo Rapone, Andrea Panaccione – notre meilleur spécialiste des socialistes menchéviques et des socialistes russes en général – Mario Telò. Mais il y quand même aussi un retour aux histoires des socialistes des années qui nous intéressent ici, avec un considérable renouveau méthodologique.

Quelques fois ce renouveau est évident, d’autres fois il est « caché » dans de travaux apparemment plus traditionnels, biographiques. Mais dans tous les cas l’orientation de ces recherches ne s’intéresse pas à mettre en lumière le débat d’idées et la restitution des lignes théoriques – révolutionnaires ou réformistes. Ces recherches tendent à dessiner une histoire sociale des socialismes en Europe, et, par le biais de la biographie, la prosopographie d’un réseau de sociabilités.

Deux entreprises peuvent être citées ici. La publication des œuvres complètes de Giacomo Matteotti (1885-1924), dirigée par l’historien florentin Stefano Caretti qui les a complétées avec des essais qui présentent ce dirigeant en dehors de son image mythique de martyr du fascisme, en expliquant ses rapports avec toute une série de pratiques et de réflexions théoriques qu’il partage avec les socialistes européens. Très enraciné dans les problèmes des ouvriers agricoles précaires de son territoires (les « braccianti » du delta du Po), Matteotti avait su aussi se confronter avec des problèmes de traduction des réformes sociales au moment du renversement des rapports de pouvoir dans une société : l’imposition fiscale, l’administration des municipalités et leurs rapports avec les coopératives et les syndicats agricoles, une opposition à la guerre rigoureuse et acharnée ; autant de problèmes proches de ceux qui sont au centre des débats internationaux, même encore dans le socialisme d’entre-deux-guerres.

Depuis 2007 jusqu’à 2013, Carlo de Maria, historien formé à l’université de Bologne et très actif dans le réseau des instituts d’histoire de la Résistance, a dirigé avec d’autres collaborateurs la publication des œuvres d’Alessandro Schiavi (1872-1965) et en 2008 lui a consacré une biographie qui se rapproche plutôt de la prosopographie (Alessandro Schiavi. Dal riformismo municipale alla federazione europea dei comuni. Una biografia: 1872-1965, Clueb, Bologne 2008). Dans cette vaste recherche, que De Maria a complété avec un volume collectif consacré à Andrea Costa (Andrea Costa e il governo della città (brossura), la ed., Reggio Emilia, Diabasis, 2010), ce qui est mis en lumière c’est tout un réseau de sociabilités, de connaissances et de pratiques qui montrent, bien au-delà de l’opposition des courants au sein du Parti Socialiste Italien, un enracinement dans l’aspiration à l’auto-organisation des couches populaires italiennes.

D’autre côté une entreprise mérite d’être signalé, qu’on peut consulter à l’adresse suivante.

Elle émane d’un groupe d’historiens extérieurs à l’université et qu’on peut définir comme « militants », mais il s’agit d’une entreprise tout à fait scientifique, dont le modèle évident mais jamais cité est le dictionnaire biographique du mouvement ouvriers français dirigé par Jean Maitron : ce sont des biographies sans hiérarchie rigoureuse entre les dirigeants nationaux et les militants ponctuels de l’histoire du mouvement ouvrier en Italie. Plusieurs volumes y sont rattachés, d’Emilio Gianni, et vont de l’émergence d’un parti socialiste soi-disant marxiste mais influencé par les cultures du positivisme, du radicalisme démocratique et du municipalisme. Ce dictionnaire complète et intègre celui dirigé dans les années 1970 par Franco Andreucci et Tommaso Detti pour les Editori Riuniti de Rome, où les biographies (presque toutes tirées du Casellario politico centrale, le fonds consacré aux opposants politiques au fascisme) privilégiaient les dirigeants politiques communistes, suivant une approche linéaire allant « de l’utopie à la science ».

Les Annali de la Fondation Gian Giacomo Feltrinelli, autrefois un des principaux lieux d’élaboration de l’histoire des mouvements ouvriers et des organisations politiques des gauches, ont dans les dernières vingt années consacré seulement un volume à un sujet proche de celui qui nous intéresse. Ce numéro a été dirigé par Maurizio Ridolfi, un historien spécialiste des cultures démocratiques et radicales du XIXe siècle. Les problèmes évoqués dans ce volume tournent autour de la question du rapport entre les idées et les réseaux démocratiques d’un côté, et le rapport à la nation et à l’accès aux responsabilités gouvernementales de l’autre.

Pour les thèmes qui nous intéressent ici, il faut surtout souligner que parmi les documents tirés des riches archives de la Fondation, outre des papiers tirés des fonds de Macchi, Cavallotti, Gnocchi Viani, William Linton, le directeur de la publication a souhaité également publier des papiers d’Eugène Varlin, le militant qui incarne les moments de la Commune de Paris les plus liés à l’expérience de l’organisation des classes ouvrières, dimension qui ouvre vers les organisations socialistes. Ce rapprochement permet notamment de souligner le rôle des associations démocratiques et mutualistes pour la formation d’une conscience et des formes d’organisations dites « de classe ».

Samuel et Simon Wajsbrot

Samuel et Simon Wajsbrot posent avec d’autres ouvriers dans un atelier de casquettiers situé rue des Francs-Bourgeois à Paris, 4e arrt, le 15 avril 1926 © Mémorial de la Shoah/C.D.J.C./M.J.P./Coll. Jean Lescot

À la toute fin du XXe siècle une histoire du socialisme a aussi été publiée, écrite par Renato Zangheri, un historien des mondes paysans et du passage de l’agriculture traditionnelle du XVIII siècle au capitalisme agraire en Italie. Ancien dirigeant du parti communiste, maire de Bologne, Zangheri a (surtout lors de colloques) dit être persuadé que la nouvelle composition des classes travailleuses – la précarité, l’introduction de l’organisation du travail dite World Class Manufacturing, la diffusion du travail intellectuel et « relationnel » – avait provoqué la désagrégation du monde du travail en tant que classe. Son analyse peut conduire aussi à des conclusions opposées, qu’on ne peut pas développer ici. Zangheri dessine donc le tableau d’un mouvement ouvrier qui va vers sa fin. Les deux volumes qui sont sortis avant sa disparition, écrits avec Attilio Zanichelli, un ouvrier de l’entreprise de verre industriel Bormioli et poète original, suivent un parcours qui démarre avec l’activité de groupes isolés animés par les exemples français de Carlo Pisacane, jusqu’aux premiers internationalistes parfois d’origine mazzinienne. Ensuite et surtout son texte retrace l’histoire des rapports entre le socialisme italien et l’histoire nationale. Les socialistes, qui enracinent leurs cultures mais surtout leurs réseaux d’organisation dans l’histoire du républicanisme démocratique et du mutualisme, sont plus intéressés que les classes dirigeantes à une unité à laquelle ils contribuent avec leurs luttes et surtout avec leur organisation qui  représentent un formidable processus d’auto-émancipation. Son ouvrage indique aussi l’unité possible entre le puissant processus d’organisation dans le Nord industriel, celui du monde des ouvriers agricoles de la vallée du Po et l’expérience démocratique des « Fasci Siciliani » dont la répression voulue par Francesco Crispi produit des effets de très longue durée pour les rapports entre le prolétariat méridional et le crime organisée.

De 2007 à 2012 un groupe d’historiens italiens et français s’est intéressé aux rapports entre l’historiographie italienne et Madeleine Rebérioux (Cahiers Jaurès, « entre France et Italie: regards croisés » : nn.183-184, 2007, 1-2) et à un retour possible à l’étude des institutions et des réseaux internationaux du socialisme « dans les pas » – quoique cette formule puisse paraître un peu trop élogieuse – de Georges Haupt à l’occasion de l’anniversaire, après 30 ans, de sa mort. Ce numéro des Cahiers Jaurès, n. 203, Georges Haupt. L’Internationale pour méthode, n. 203, 1-2014 a rassemblé des témoins ayant connu Haupt et des historiens qui ont cherché ou se proposaient de chercher d’en utiliser la méthode. Comme j’avais écrit moi-même en présentant aux lecteurs ce numéro :

« il était temps de rouvrir un “dossier Haupt” bien au-delà de la mémoire, c’est à dire de présenter l’actualité d’une méthode sur des sujets qu’il avait déjà puissamment contribué à installer au centre de l’histoire et de la culture des sociétés européennes. Le sommaire de ce numéro l’atteste. D’une part, il présente des contributions « dans les pas » de Haupt, contributions qui montrent la vitalité de sa méthode (Bidussa, Candar, Ducange, Meriggi). D’autre part, il comprend des réflexions qui croisent l’évocation d’une personnalité et son rayonnement sur le travail de divers historiens (Dreyfus, Jemnitz, Löwy, Pa-naccione, Weill). Mariuccia Salvati de son côté revient, dans un texte passionnant, sur les rapports de Haupt avec Lelio Basso et sur les liens qui ont permis, entre autres, la naissance et le développement de la Fondation du même nom, ainsi que l’affirmation de son rôle au croisement de la politique et de la recherche. Dans les recherches de Haupt, le thème des échanges militants et intellectuels non seulement dans les pays capitalistes qui avaient vu naître les partis socialistes, mais aussi dans l’Europe centrale et orientale, était présent depuis ses débuts. Il a développé cette orientation dans de nombreux articles et livres collectifs. Cette démarche orientait aussi sa vie : il mettait constamment en relation hommes et femmes au croisement de la recherche et de la politique. Il est l’un des très rares historiens qui a souligné plutôt les continuités sociales que les coupures politiques entre les Deuxième et Troisième Internationales, comme l’atteste la publication de la correspondance entre Camille Huysmans et Lénine dont il s’occupa ».

« Dans les pas » de cette méthode j’ai publié moi-même une recherche encore in progress, cité dans la bibliographie suivante, L’Internazionale degli operai (2014). Elle cherche à tisser, avant et après la Grande guerre, un double réseau de relations. D’un côté les analyses des partis socialistes et du Bureau socialiste international autour des migrations et du colonialisme, impliquant aussi les rapports avec les travailleurs non européens. De l’autre côté la rencontre sur le marché du travail entre les travailleurs « autochtones » et les travailleurs étrangers.

Pour résumer dans une formule toutes ces tensions et les moyens employés par les acteurs sociaux et politiques, on pourrait dire que le marché du travail et la nécessité de s’organiser dans les lieux du travail quotidien ont imposé une tension constante entre les pôles opposés de la xénophobie et de l’internationalisme. Entre les deux on observe des comportements différents, parfois contradictoires, qui tendent tous à chercher à gouverner le marché du travail, à s’opposer à ses « lois » économiques.

groupe parlementaire

Groupe parlementaire socialiste aux élections de 1913. Carte postale tiré du site FB Associazione nazionale Sandro Pertini

La recherche autour de « l’Internationale des ouvriers » parcourt ces problèmes et fait appel à des sources parfois peu exploitées telles que les archives du Bureau Socialiste International et évidemment les sources sur les comportements ouvriers « xénophobes » ou « fraternels », des fonds Moscou aux Archives Nationales et des Archives de la Police de Paris. La France représente un lieu privilégié de ces tensions parce qu’elle héberge déjà avant la Grande guerre une immigration nombreuse et plurielle. Dans les comportements des mondes du travail – par exemple dans les chantiers qui couvrent Paris dans les années 1930 – observés à la loupe et dans les secteurs du textile, de la maroquinerie, de la fabrication des casquettes et des chapeaux, ni la xénophobie ni l’antisémitisme émergent sauf quelques manifestations isolées et surtout elles épargnent les immigrés plus disposés à se syndiquer, dont ceux d’origine juive. C’est le cas des protagonistes de premier plan de la Main d’œuvre immigrée au sein de la CGTU. Dans une période où les agents politiques de l’antisémitisme et de la xénophobie étaient très actifs, ce fait mérite d’être analysé et ce thème spécifique est l’objet d’un travail en cours de préparation. Il s’agit donc là d’un essai d’histoire sociale, aussi bien des comportements ouvriers que des institutions socialistes et syndicales.

Maria Grazia Meriggi

ENGLISH VERSION

Almost everywhere in Europe but especially in Italy, a deep bond existed between the history of socialism, the history of trade unionism and the history of the worlds of work. On several occasions, one has noted a return to the histories of the worlds of work and migrations by historians of the last generation.

Until the 1970s, historians were passionate about labor struggles and their political histories. Nowadays, young historians of the worlds of work are somewhat distrustful when it comes to mingling these themes. Most of the historical publications about socialisms are rather devoted to “republican” history, to the vicissitudes of socialist parties until the crisis caused with Bettino Craxi and the corruption trials which affected the government parties. I am only mentioning a few names here: the great historian and master Enzo Collotti, Luciano Marrocu, Leonardo Rapone, Andrea Panaccione – our leading expert in Menshevik socialists and Russian socialists at large – or even Mario Telò.

However, there is indeed a return to the history of the socialists of the period we are interested in, along with a major methodological renewal. Sometimes this renewal is obvious, but at other times, it is “hidden” in seemingly more traditional and biographical works. In all cases, the direction taken by this research is not interested in bringing to light the debate on ideas and the reconstruction of theoretical confrontations – whether they be revolutionary or reformist. This research rather tends to draw a social history of European socialisms and, through biography, the prosopography of a sociabilities network.

Two undertakings can be cited above all. The publication of the complete works of Giacomo Matteotti (1885-1924), edited by the Florentine historian Stefano Caretti who completed them with essays that at last allowed to understand this political leader out of his mythical image of martyr of fascism, explaining the relationships with a whole series of practices and theoretical reflections he shared with European socialists.

Since 2007 until 2013, Carlo de Mari – an historian educated at the University of Bologna who was very active in the network of historical institutes devoted to resistance – edited with other colleagues the publication of the works of Alessandro Schiavi (1872-1965) and wrote his biography in 2008: Alessandro Schiavi. Dal riformismo municipale alla federazione europea dei comuni. Una biografia: 1872-1965, Clueb, Bologne 2008. In this extensive research, that De Maria completed  with a collective volume dedicated to Andrea Costa (Andrea Costa e il governo della città, l’ed., Reggio Emilia, Diabasis, 2010), he brought into light a network of sociabilities, knowledge and practices that went far beyond the opposition between the internal trends within the Italian Socialist Party, showing the anchorage of italian working classes self-organization reflexes.

Another undertaking is noteworthy

This initiative comes from a group of historians external to the university and that one could characterize as “activists”, but this is a scientific undertaking whose model is the biographical dictionary of the french labor movement, edited by Jean Maitron.

From 2007 to 2012, a group of italian and french historians took an interest in the relationships between the italian historiography and Madeleine Rebérioux (Cahiers Jaurès, “entre France et Italie: régards croisés”: nn.183-184, 2007, 1-2) and encouraged the return to the study of institutions and international networks of socialism “following the footsteps” of Georges Haupt: the issue of the Cahiers Jaurès, n. 203, Georges Haupt. L’Internationale pour méthode, n. 203, 1-2014 gathered together witnesses and historians who sought to pursue his method.

“Following the footsteps” of this method, I myself published a research paper still in progress (see bibliography). It seeks to study – before and after the Great War – a double relationship network. On the one hand, it analyzes the socialist parties and the International Socialist Bureau around the notions of migrations and colonialism, which also implies relationships with non-European workers. On the other hand, it analyzes the meeting between “native” workers and foreign workers on the labor market and in the working sites.

Maria Grazia Meriggi

French & English full version